Teaching macroeconomics using podcasts..

Prof  William J. Luther of Kenyon College has developed an interesting way of teaching macroeconomics.

He develops podcasts (like NPR Radio podcasts)and sends it to students before the class. It has been very effective:

Unfamiliar with aggregate concepts like gross domestic product and inflation, many introductory students struggle to understand the big ideas in macroeconomics. Macroeconomic educators typically respond with boring lectures aimed at bringing students up to speed; or, by jumping to the interesting topics their students are not yet prepared to consider.

In an effort to combat this problem, I have incorporated NPR’s Planet Money podcast into my Principles of Macroeconomics course. I describe the podcast and provide a list of episodes others might find useful. In my experience, the Planet Money podcast is well received.

Students enjoy listening to the assigned episodes. They report that it made them more interested in the principles course, helped them understand the relevance of macroeconomics, and increased their understanding of many macroeconomic issues. Most students also feel more comfortable discussing macroeconomic issues having listened to the podcast. And nearly half of those students surveyed say they will continue listening to the podcast after the course ends.

Interesting way to make macro interesting..

 

Manyteacher-­‐scholarsreferencepopularmediaintheclassroomorinout-­‐of-­‐classexercisestoillustratethepracticalrelevanceofthecoursematerialwhilecapturingtheattentionofstudents.Diamond(2009),Ghentetal(2011),Hall(2005),Holian(2011),Mateer(2004)andMateerandStephenson(2001)usevideoclipsfrompopularmoviesandtelevisionshowstoillustrateeconomicconcepts.HallandLawson(2008)uselyricsfrompopularsongs.Lawson(2006)constructsassignmentswithcomicstrips.Alongtheselines,IhaveincorporatedNPR’sPlanetMoneypodcastintoanintroductorymacroeconomicscourse.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


%d bloggers like this: