15 August is an important day for monetary economy scholars…

It was on 15 Aug 1971 that President Nixon closed the gold-dollar window.

45 years ago today, on August 15, 1971, President Richard Nixon officially closed the gold window. While US citizens had been forbidden from owning gold or from redeeming their gold certificates for gold coins since the early 1930s, foreign governments still had the privilege of redeeming their dollars for gold. Due to the Federal Reserve’s inflationary monetary policy during the 1960s, foreign governments began to redeem more and more dollars for gold. Attempts to encourage other governments (especially France) not to redeem their dollar holdings were unsuccessful, and there was a very real threat that US gold holdings might eventually be exhausted. So President Nixon decided to close the gold window, thus severing the final link between the US dollar and gold. The removal of the restraint of gold redemption freed the Federal Reserve to engage in more inflationary monetary policy than ever. The effects of that on money supply and official price inflation figures are readily apparent.

The demonetization of silver in the Coinage Act of 1873 was widely assailed by its critics as the “Crime of ’73.” Isn’t it about time that Nixon’s closing of the gold window be known as the Crime of ’71? 

Hmmm..

As someone interested in monetary affairs, 15 August is of double importance. One can say it was only post 15 August that monetary economics became really important. Before this central banks were hardly as important who were just pegging currency to either gold or to dollar. Post 15-Aug-1971, central banks started emerging as a force to become a hydra headed monster we see them today..

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: