Do economists really ever retire?

Bad news, they don’t. Infact their aura and prestige could be even more post retirement.

David Price has a piece:

No doubt there are some economists who retire so they can put their profession in the rear-view mirror. But many, it seems, never truly leave eco­nomics behind. They continue practicing economics long after they’ve nominally retired or taken emeritus status — and even when they eventually stop, the economist’s way of thinking sticks with them.

For some, the compulsion to do economics in retirement takes the form of publishing. Elmus Wicker, 90, a former Rhodes Scholar who retired from Indiana University in 1992, turned to writing and publishing three books for university presses on economic history. Not resting on his laurels, he has drafted a fourth.

“It never occurred to me that retirement meant doing something else,” he says. “And it never occurred to me that maybe I wasn’t still qualified.”

Bruce Yandle retired from Clemson University in 2000, then returned in 2005 to serve for two years as a dean, then retired again for good. But he has maintained an adjunct affiliation with another institution, the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, where, among other activities, he advises graduate students on their master’s and doctoral theses. “Interaction with young people who are excited about ideas has a contagion associated with it,” he observes. (See also “Interview: Bruce Yandle,” Region Focus, Second Quarter 2011.)

After Leonard Schifrin retired from the College of William and Mary in 1998, he found a lot of work coming his way in his field of health care economics, especially contract research for the federal government and expert-witness work in litigation. “I was busy for eight years traveling and doing interesting things,” he recalls. “That was a lot of fun and really postponed my retirement from being an economist.

All this sounds good for this blog but perhaps not so much for its visitors…Though it is still many years away from retirement….

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