Archive for June 15th, 2017

Old economics is based on false ‘laws of physics’ – new economics can save us

June 15, 2017

KAte Raworth has written this new bookDoughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist.

In this piece she says what is wrong with current economics (Physics envy) and suggestions to improve the subject.

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Mixing behavioral economics with ethnography…

June 15, 2017

Interesting post by UK’s Behavioral Insights Team. I am also wondering what took so long for behavioral studies to use insights from ethnography.

BIT is  trying to streamline the procurement system in Government hospitals. While engaging in the study, they used ethnography to study behaviors more deeply:

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Where does World Health Organisation get its economic advice?

June 15, 2017

From nobody and hence it needs a chief economist urgently.

Amanda Glassman has a post on how WHO messes up on basic health economics. She also links to this more detailed letter by health economics expert citing many mistakes made by WHO.

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Designing a Hoysala style temple in today’s times..

June 15, 2017

As we do away with most traditions and legacies despite their utilities, some people are trying to revive the same.

Came across this fascinating piece on how a new temple in Karnataka will be based on Hoysala style of archutecture. Even more interesting (and depressing) is to see a Welshman leading the project:

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Comparing Rainfall patterns and human settlement in tropical Africa and Asia

June 15, 2017

Interesting study by Kostadis Papaioannou and Ewout Frankema. If geography was given adequate focus while teaching economics, these issues should have been pretty well-known:

Our study adds support to the idea that the climatological challenges posed to agricultural development were larger in tropical Africa than in tropical Asia, and that this may be one of the keys to understanding why large parts of tropical Asia have historically been more densely populated than tropical Africa. In so far as higher degrees of climatological variability posed more severe constraints to the adoption of modern, productivity-enhancing farming technologies, this may also partially account for the diverging trajectories of agricultural development in the post-1960 era.

However, the implications of our findings go even further. The increasing frequency and intensity of weather shocks observed today, such as heat waves, droughts, floods, and hurricanes, adversely affect conditions of agricultural production and jeopardise efforts to achieve global food security. A rapidly expanding literature shows that climate-induced food shortages pose severe threats to societal cohesion by triggering civil conflict, raising property crime rates, and increasing migration (Miguel et al. 2004, Papaioannou 2017).

The effects of climate change are felt harder in Africa than elsewhere. Our study suggests that African farmers also have a longer experience in coping with climate shocks, even though more evidence is needed to explore whether this has been a structural historical condition, or one specific for the interwar era.

 


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