Why should historians tweet?

Beatrice Cherrier has a long post (which is also her paper) encouraging historians to tweet:

Tweeting from scratch only requires a computer and an hour time. Set up an account, choose a name for your handle, read a few “how too” guides to get a sense of what the twitter etiquette is, how to use a #hashtag, how to ask a question and pursue a conversation, and you’re ready to put your thoughts, links and pictures online, and to read those by any other user. Those by the people you follow will appear on your screen in the order they are posted, creating a timeline. You can like a tweet (which is akin to bookmarking), retweet to make it visible to those who follow you, comment, reply and enter a discussion. You can see whatever a nations president, a journalist, a central banker, a blogger, a Nobel Prize recipient, a rockstar economist or a registered colleague sees fit to package in 140 characters and put online. You can also engage with any of them.

This is where most historians of economics might be tempted to quit reading. For what kind of scholarly idea can be expressed and circulated in 140 characters? Are years of research, construction of objects and subtle methodological distinctions reducible to a 15 words sentence? This social media thing  is total nonsense! The purpose of this post, therefore, is to convince the reader to rethink her resistance to using social network for scholarly purpose, by outlining the various functions twitter can serve in historical research. It is not intended as a “how to” guide or a set of warnings. First, because tutorials specifically designed for historians and discussionsof twitter’s shortcomings – from trolling to abuse, limited impact, ephemeral attention, dopamine surge and fleeting illusion of mastery – already abound on the web. Second, because each platform aimed at creating and sharing content and networking has its own set of interaction rules and technological constraints. These rules are constantly transformed, and several platforms, including twitter, might not survive 2017. The present discussion therefore seek to emancipate from the institutional and technical constraints associated with tweeting to focus on the new practices and questions it generates, and their significance for historians of economics.

For tweeting is not merely about compressing an idea in 140 characters and sending it in the wild, though that exercise is interesting it itself. It allows the dissemination of working papers and professional news, and fosters the development of new objects such as a thread or a tweetstorm, a series of tweets which, taken together, introduce a more elaborated opinion, a narrative, a set of papers or a list of references. Writing a tweetstorm is an interesting writing exercise for a historian. It has to be consistent and organized enough so that the reader will want to read the next one to the bottom of the thread. 140 characters do not allow subtle logical articulation and transitions, so that overall consistency requires shaping a kind of flow, a simple yet compelling narrative arc, possibly a chronological one. Doing so forces the writer to weed her story until its spinal chord is excavated and strengthened.

 The most straightforward benefit of twitter is to improve scholarly communication, but this plays out differently depending on the state of each discipline. In history of economics specifically, it raises questions of objects and audiences. Less known, but equally promising, is how twitter can serve as a tool for researching and writing the history of economics. 

Indeed.

Using Social networks can actually helps historians quite a bit.

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