Where motor parts are recycled into furniture

Nice work done by Jodhpur based firm Priti International.

Does an old military truck or a dismantled part of an old car or a broken bicycle have any place in a restaurant or a lounge bar where one would go to enjoy food or wine? Shouldn’t these things belong to the junkyard and stay there?

No, if you ask 44-year-old Ritesh Lohia. You give him junk and chances are high that he would turn it into a piece of furniture that attracts attention due to its unorthodox design. That his creations are already exported to nearly 40 countries only corroborates that there is indeed a demand for his furniture that originates from junk.

Mr. Lohia is one of the promoters of Priti International, which he started along with his wife Priti Lohia, after whom the company is named. Since starting the recycling business around 2010, the husband-wife duo has transformed parts of old trucks, cars, bicycles and various machines into dining and coffee tables, bar stools and chairs, lamp shades and cabinets among other things.

“We started the company in 2005 for making furniture and handicraft items but hit upon the idea of recycling only around 2010-11. Since then, the business has taken a strong positive turn. There is a lot of demand for the things we make,” he said.

…..

The couple struck gold in their own junkyard while figuring out what can be done with the waste that their factories generated. What started as an in-house recycling project quickly transformed into full-scale recycling that now contributes to almost 70% of their production.

“We had an advantage in terms of location. Jodhpur has a big defence installation and a military auction house. We started purchasing old trucks and machines that were being auctioned there,” said Mr. Lohia.

Superb…

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One Response to “Where motor parts are recycled into furniture”

  1. Bethany Birchridge Says:

    It’s so cool that Mr. Lohia uses recycled auto parts to build furniture. I’ve also heard that used car parts can be refurbished and reused–especially since not all the parts of a junked car are broken. Thanks for such an interesting article on recycling auto parts.

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