The Effect of Superstition on Health: Evidence from the Taiwanese Ghost Month

Martin Halla, Chia-Lun Liu and Jin-Tan Liu in this interesting research paper:

Superstition is a widespread phenomenon. We empirically examine its impact on health-related behavior and health outcomes. We study the case of the Taiwanese Ghost Month.

During this period, which is believed to increase the likelihood of bad outcomes, we observe substantial adaptions in health-related behavior. Our identification exploits idiosyncratic variation in the timing of the Ghost Month across Gregorian calendar years.

Using high-quality administrative data, we document for the period of the Ghost Months reductions in mortality, hospital admissions, and births. While the effect on mortality is a quantum effect, the latter two effects reflect changes in the timing of events. These findings suggest potential benefits of including emotional and cultural factors in public health policy.

Hmm..

One Response to “The Effect of Superstition on Health: Evidence from the Taiwanese Ghost Month”

  1. Mixed Up Says:

    My favorite theme for WordPres is Zeroerror,and I think developers such as Digitalnature and Studiopress are cool.

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