Archive for August 6th, 2019

How private prisons affect sentencing?

August 6, 2019

Christian Dippel and Michael Poyker in this voxeu piece:

Speaking Truth to Power..

August 6, 2019

A huge responsibility for those who advise the governments esp in today’s times. Speaking truth to power is like who will bell the cat.

Joseph Nye writes on appointment of Director of National Defense:

Many partisans accused President George W. Bush of lying and pressuring the intelligence community to produce intelligence to justify a war that Bush had already chosen. But the situation was complicated, and to understand the problems of speaking truth to power, we must clear away the myths.

Political leaders cannot be blamed for the analytical failures of intelligence, but they can be held accountable when they go beyond the intelligence and exaggerate to the public what it says. US Vice President Dick Cheney said there was “no doubt” that Saddam had WMD, and Bush stated flatly that the evidence indicated that Iraq was reconstituting its nuclear programs. Such statements ignored the doubts and caveats that were expressed in the main bodies of the intelligence reports.
Trust in intelligence runs in cycles in our democracy. During the Cold War, intelligence officials were often seen as heroes. After Vietnam, they became villains. September 11 restored public recognition that good intelligence is more important than ever, but the failure to find WMD in Iraq renewed suspicion again, and Trump has used it to obscure the problem of Russian interference in American elections.
The lessons for the next American DNI are clear. In addition to the bureaucratic tasks of coordinating budgets and agencies, he (or she) will have to monitor tradecraft in collection of intelligence, defend rigorous use of alternative techniques for analyzing it, and ensure careful presentation to political leaders and the public. Above all, the DNI has a duty to speak truth to power.

Was Mr Say the ultimate nemesis of Lord Keynes?

August 6, 2019

Profs. Alain Béraud and Guy Numa in this piece says we usually think that Keynes and Say were at opposite ends of each other. However, they are far more proximate than it is imagined:

In economics we love this comparison of this vs that. But if we analyse closely, there are more similarities than differences.  

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