How does a city get to be ‘smart’? This is how Tel Aviv did it

One does not even know the meaning of a smart city but has become a buzzword.

If it means having technology in whatever we do, then it could also mean every step can be recorded.

However, there is another model of using technology selectively and make the city more people centric. For instance, Tel Aviv is doing its bit to use tech to involve citizens and become so called smart city. Interestingly, Thane has adopted Tel Aviv strategy as well:

Smart cities, digital cities, virtual cities, connected cities. Are these just trendy buzzwords? Perhaps. But these types of cities are supported by infrastructure that is more than bricks and mortar.  These cities are smart (thoughtful, people-centric), digital (driven by data acquisition, measured, analysed and sometimes exchanged) and virtual (experiential). And, as a result, they are connected, creating more potential interactions between people and their place.

Tel Aviv is one of these cities. Undoubtedly the 2009 book Start-Up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle contributed to its reputation as a “non-stop city” with innovation clusters teeming with companies at the cutting edge of technology.

However, Tel Aviv’s standing is not only built on commercial success — it has an internationally recognised local government. Winning first placein the 2014 World Smart City Awards not only boosted its profile on the international stage, but Tel Avivians, well, they actually have positive things to say about their local government.

I find all this tech usage a bit too much. One would still say Copenhagen type model is a better bet.

On Tel Aviv, there is also this interesting link on the city’s new Independence Trail…

 

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